The heart of darkness, the liver of twilight, and…

the brain of the day…

16th century anatomical drawing of the brain

16th century anatomical drawing of the brain

Today as we were leaving clay class with Tom, he said, “I want all your work to come from the heart of darkness.” And I asked, “What about the liver of twilight?”

I thought, but didn’t say at the time, the completer of the triad, “The brain of the day.” Interesting: the immediate expressions of distaste from some of the other students at the mention of liver.

anatomical drawing of the liver

Still, I really enjoyed the play of analogies. I went to internal organs in the class itself, since the wedding vessel I had in mind to craft for a renewal of vows with Sefla took a rather larger shape than I had imagined, and at one point I thought to make it resemble the dual chambers of a physical heart.

anatomical drawing of the heartBut the end result of the piece was to create a hand, reaching up from below the vessel. I called it “the hand of God” at one point, and tried in my mind to say “hand of the goddess,” but since I’d modelled it so closely on my own mangled left hand, it had none of the feminine qualities I would want to see in her hand, so it had to remain an image of his. Not the romantic piece I’d imagined creating when the idea of making a South American two-chambered wedding vessel for the renewal of our vows came to me at the prior class…

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About

Fred is a Teaching Artist, an arts integration advocate & a social justice activist. He is near completing a two-month Residency as String Game Performance Teacher at Calabasas Elementary School in Watsonville, CA, and performed at the 2015 Santa Cruz Storytelling Festival. He also serves as Teacher Consultant for Professional Development with UCSC's Central California Writing Project and as their Technology Liaison to the National Writing Project. He is a Connected Learning Facilitator and coordinates Face To Face Drop Ins on Connected Learning biweekly at Arts Council Santa Cruz County. He teaches self-directed & connected learning via real-world projects & string games through his Original Digital Project, an Associate of the Arts Council.

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